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Is it possible I may have way, way too many tomatoes growing in my garden? Yep. I planted tomato and pepper seeds in mid March, so the seedlings were ready and waiting for the weather to warm enough to plant them in the garden. All through the month of April the weather yo-yo’d as warm fronts met cold ones. With each cycle the next warm spell was a bit warmer, but even so, we had a late frost so it was a good thing that I didn’t jump the gun and plant too early. Finally, when the Pecans and Crepe Myrtles leafed out, self-sown flower seedlings popped up in flower beds, and my gardener-neighbors started asking if I had any extra plants to set out, I decided the time had come to get out and get dirty.

I pricked out seedlings and potted each in its very own container using good lightweight potting soil so I could be sure that the tender, young roots wouldn’t be damaged and any leftovers would survive. So, the tomatoes have been planted and the same goes for some peppers. I’ll finish setting those out today and plant okra, lima beans (AKA Butter Beans in the South), and plant corn to start my Three Sisters Garden. After the corn comes up in a few days I’ll interplant it with running beans and squash –pumpkins in my case since the squash I plan to plant is not a vining type. Since we have a long growing season in this part of the country I waited until late April to start seeds of Eggplant, Melons, Summer Squash (Zucchini, Yellow, and Pattypan), Herbs, and other cool stuff such as Tomatillos to make wonderful green sauce for Mexican dishes. Once those seedlings have at least one set of true leaves I’ll pop those in the garden then sit and wait for the bounty to begin.

Now, if you believe I’m going to spend the next month or so just sitting back and waiting for veggies to produce and flowers to spring into full bloom just waiting for me to cut and bring them inside for lovely, fragrant arrangements, I’ve got a piece of property and a bridge or two you might be interested in purchasing…



plant profiles
EVERY MONTH, ONE OR MORE PLANTS WILL BE FEATURED HERE

THE THREE SISTERS GARDEN

Corn provides a natural pole for bean vines to climb and squash vines act as mulch that shades weeds and helps prevent soil from drying out. Spiny squash plants also help discourage animals from approaching the corn and beans. (I hope this includes deer, but somehow I doubt that.) At the end of the growing season the dried stalks, leaves, and roots from this planting combination can be worked back into the soil to improve its structure and since beans fix nitrogen on their roots, the fertility of the plot is improved as a bonus.





tip of the month
- SHRUBS THAT FLOWER IN THE EARLY SPRING ON LAST YEAR'S WOOD SUCH AS FORSYTHIA SHOULD BE PRUNED IMMEDIATELY AFTER FLOWERING TO PREVENT CUTTING OFF NEXT YEAR'S FLOWER BUDS; THOSE THAT BLOOM LATER IN THE SUMMER ON NEW WOOD CAN BE SAFELY PRUNED BEFORE BLOOMING TO FORCE NEW GROWTH AND A HEAVY FLUSH OF FLOWERS -





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